Animal rescue expands

Cats to have new home

By Elaine Ezerins

Staff Writer

Just
The Facts

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ST. ALBANS — Cats in the care of Franklin County Animal Rescue (FCAR) awaiting adoption will soon have a new home.

FCAR is expanding their operations from their location on Sunset Meadows to now include an office building on Route 104, between Route 36 and the Maple Fields by Interstate 89.

“We’re not moving, we’re expanding,” Stephanie Lavoie, the dog adoption counselor, said. “So we’re keeping the old building and that’s going to be all incoming cats and dogs.”

Incoming animals have just been surrendered. They still need to be vetted and are not available for adoption yet, Lavoie explained.

The other building is at 141 Fairfax Road in St. Albans. “It’s a low long building with lots of windows,” she said. “And that will be adoptable cats and all the offices.”

“I’m really excited,” she said. “Once the cats are gone, we have that whole front lobby that I’m going to be able to use as a doggy area.”

Currently, more than five adoptable cats relax in the reception area at the Sunset Meadows location, waiting to be pet. When they’re gone, dogs ready for adoption will be able to greet prospective owners at the door.

“Right now, whenever somebody wants to meet a dog, they have to go outside and stand in the rain or the wind or what not,” Lavoie said. “This way they’ll be able to hang out in the front lobby with the dog. We can make it more of a house setting to kind of get them used to being in a house.”

The adoptable cats will have to wait before they can explore their new home on Fairfax Road. Lavoie said the expansion is a slow going process because FCAR has to completely alter the building to meet the animals’ needs.

With the expansion, FCAR plans to offer more veterinary services. Lavoie said they really want to do more education of the public on good animal care, vaccines and spay and neutering.

Lavoie said the animal rescue plans to pay for the new building in a number of ways.

“One of the ways we’re trying to make money is we’re really pushing our spay and neuter program,” Lavoie said. “We have a low cost spay and neuter program. It’s like $75 to spay your cat and $45 to neuter your cat. And for dogs, I think the most is $190.”

“The majority of it goes to the actual medical expenses to do the procedure to pay for the vet and what not,” she said, “but any leftovers is going to getting our building up and running.”

“Our wonderful director of operations Heather Laing has been working very hard writing grants and we’re trying to do a capital campaign,” Lavoie said. “We’re a non-profit so we don’t have a lot of money set aside. It’s just us fundraising.”

One of their big fundraisers will be FCAR’s annual Calcutta.

The expansion is set to occur in the next couple months, but in the mean time there are twenty cats and eight dogs up for adoption. With the one-time cost of $125 for kittens, $100 for cats and $195 for dogs, the animals are all spayed and neutered, vaccinated and checked for various diseases.